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THE EVOLUTION OF THE WORKERS CLUB

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The Evolution of The Workers Club

Four-years into its lifespan, The Workers Club (TWC) continues to evolve its effortless product offer into A/W19 - inspired by workwear, functionality and the very best in quality fabrics and design. Through a craftsmanship that combines both British and Japanese fabrics and inspiration, TWC is the brainchild of Adam and Charlotte Cameron.

After spending time working together in New York, it was back in the UK where Adam’s work as the head of design at Dunhill, first introduced him to Japanese manufacturers - many of which TWC still uses today.

Now, moving into A/W19, The Workers Club unveils an exciting new addition to the outwear collection, with the reversible Rain Mac. The newly crowned signature raincoat is constructed from an exclusive 100% wool, plaid fabric, woven at the prestigious Lovat Mill in Scotland, complete with a reverse side delivered in a compact cotton. Made to a limited number, the Rain Mac can be made to order and in a fabric of the customer's choosing, which gives an extra element of originality.

“This piece carries a real 1960s Savile Row vibe, adapted as a statement field-wear garment,” says Adam Cameron. With signature TWC attention to detail featured, the Rain Mac has an equal focus on the functionality and practicality of the piece - key elements include welt pockets on both sides; Set in sleeve front and Raglan sleeve back for added movement as well as a five-button front closure to be worn as a layered overcoat or on its own, and priced at £695. Emerging in 2015, The Workers Club DNA is driven by a lifestyle that cleverly pieces together a life in the country as well as a life in the city.

With an ethos of ‘buy less but better’, TWC puts focus on the quality of product and fabrics with a belief in sustainability through better investment and a continued mission to create a wardrobe for men who appreciate timeless style. “We of course admire certain brands, but very few have stayed true to their core values whereas most have changed direction frequently or just never evolved,” says Adam. With denim carrying a price of £265, TWC is keen to communicate the importance of its quality with key pieces, such as made in Japan Denim from mill to maker through to laundry, with many Japanese brands favouring the same methodology and the very same manufacturers.

TWC now plans to grow their presence internationally through their e-commerce platform with the goal to have stockists in key markets including France, Germany, Denmark, USA and Japan. “This strategy will help to drive traffic back to our site,” says Adam “We want to partner with like-minded companies and to create a timeless brand that stays true to who we are.”

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